you asked that we gather additional information on the
agencies with the largest number of law enforcement investigative
personnel. Specifically, we determined the following.
the types of violations investigated by these agencies;
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the authorities under which these agencies’ personnel investigate
suspected federal criminal law violations, execute search warrants, make
arrests, and/or carry firearms;
the number of law enforcement investigative personnel in these agencies
as of September 30, 1995, and, of those personnel, the number authorized
to execute search warrants, make arrests, and/or carry firearms; and
the number of law enforcement investigative personnel at these agencies
at the end of fiscal years 1987, 1991, and 1995.
For our November 1995 testimony, we obtained information from
OPM
’s
CPDF
as of March 31, 1995. As agreed with the Subcommittee, we obtained
information for this report on the 10 agencies or agency components with
the largest number of law enforcement investigative personnel as
identified in the
CPDF
and reported in our November testimony. The law
enforcement investigative personnel in these 10 agencies comprised over
90 percent of the investigative personnel identified in the November 1995
testimony. In addition, as agreed with the Subcommittee and using a
threshold of 700 law enforcement investigative personnel, we obtained
information directly from 2 agencies that do not report data to
OPM
and
from 1 agency whose
CPDF
data we were unable to use for this analysis
because of coding anomalies. We identified these three additional agencies
with at least 700 law enforcement investigative personnel through our
research. The names of these 13 agencies are as follows:
Federal Bureau of Investigation (
FBI
);
Immigration and Naturalization Service (
INS
);
Drug Enforcement Administration (
DEA
);
U.S. Marshals Service;
Internal Revenue Service (
IRS
);
U.S. Secret Service;
U.S. Customs Service;
Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco and Firearms (
ATF
);
Department of the Interior, National Park Service (
NPS
);
Department of the Navy, Naval Criminal Investigative Service (
NCIS
);
U.S. Postal Inspection Service (data were not in the
CPDF
);
U.S. Capitol Police (data were not in the
CPDF
); and
Department of State, Bureau of Diplomatic Security (
DS
) (we were unable
to use
CPDF
-reported data).
Consistent with our November 1995 testimony, we defined “law
enforcement criminal investigative personnel” as those personnel
employed in occupational series that significantly involve investigative
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B-272478
work and that meet the definition of “law enforcement officer” in section
5541(3) of Title 5 of the U.S. Code for purposes of certain premium pay
provisions.
2
Law enforcement investigative personnel and the broader
term “law enforcement personnel” can be defined in numerous ways,
depending on the information sought. We believe our definition of law
enforcement investigative personnel (a subset of all law enforcement
personnel), as used in this study, best meets the Subcommittee’s needs.
3
To obtain information on the types of criminal violations investigated, the
agencies’ investigative authority, and the authority of the agencies’ law
enforcement investigative personnel to execute search warrants, make
arrests, and carry firearms, we administered a survey to all 13 agencies.
We reviewed the returned surveys for completeness and consistency,
verified the accuracy of the cited investigative authority, and reconciled
any discrepancies with agency officials. We also used the survey to obtain
fiscal year-end data on the numbers of law enforcement investigative
personnel employed by the 13 agencies and authorized to perform certain
functions. In our analysis of changes in the number of law enforcement
investigative personnel we used
CPDF
data for all the agencies except the
Postal Inspection Service, the Capitol Police, and
DS
. For these three
agencies, we used data from the survey responses. In our analysis of
changes in the number of personnel, we focused on fiscal years 1987, 1991,
and 1995 because consistent
CPDF
data were not readily available for other
years.

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